Thursday, September 29, 2016

10 Historical facts about U.S. Marshals by Paty Jager



I found this book, The History of U.S. Marshals by Robin Langley Sommer when I was writing my historical western romance, Improper Pinkerton. I wanted my female Pinkerton to come up against a U.S. Marshal, but I needed to know information about the occupation.  Below are some interesting tidbits about the marshals.

1) The offices of U.S. marshal and deputy marshal were established in 1789 by the Judiciary Act which established the federal judicial system. Their job was to support the federal courts. 

2) Their duties were to serve subpoenas, summonses, writs, warrants, and other processed issued by the courts. As well as arrests and handle prisoners. They disbursed money- paying the fees and expenses of the court clerks, U.S. attorneys, jurors, and witnesses.  Another job was renting courtrooms and jail space, and hiring bailiffs, criers, and janitors. 

3) Before the Civil War, The U.S. Marshals in the North were called upon to capture runaway slaves and return them to the South and the Southern U.S. Marshals tried to stop the slave trade under the realms of piracy. 

4) In the 1800’s before the Civil War, the marshals worked to track down and break up counterfeiting rings.  It was estimated that one-third of the money in circulation by 1860 was counterfeit.

5) During the Civil War the marshals arrested suspected traitors and Confederate sympathizers. They also confiscated property being used to support the rebellion. 

6) 1870-71 the U.S. marshals and deputies supervised all the polling places for Congressional elections to stop the violence against politically active blacks. This was an attempt to defuse the Klan and similar organizations who wore masks or disguises and attacked citizens of different races, colors, and condition of servitude.

7) On the frontier they were the highest ranking law enforcers. 

8) Their duties out west included making sure the mail was delivered and not stolen. They spent many days and months tracking out outlaws who robbed stages and trains taking the mail and currency.  They protected the Indians on reservations, keeping the whites from encroaching on the land the government gave the tribes.  
9) Usually marshals and deputies didn’t shoot to kill and didn’t travel in a large posse.  They usually traveled in groups of four or five along with a wagon for supplies and could be used as a jail. They watched for stolen horses, suspicious travelers, stills, contraband whiskey, and wanted men. 

10) They were paid $.06 per mile traveled and $2 for an arrest. A good year they would make $500.

Paty Jager writes murder mysteries and steamy romance starring cowboys and Indians.
blog / websiteFacebook / Paty's Posse / Goodreads / Twitter / Pinterest

Photo from
www.piecesofhistory.com

Monday, September 26, 2016

Catch a Clue - Find an Author



Every Monday catch a clue about a new to you mystery, thriller, or suspense book or author. 

Authors: In comments give readers a five sentence passage from one of your books. 

Include:
Title
Author
genre (mystery, thriller, suspense)
buy link
Website or Amazon Author page link. 

Go here for easy to follow instruction on how to hyper link your the buy link and your website or Author Page.  https://exquisitequills.blogspot.com/p/how-to-use-active-links-in-comments.html


Readers enjoy finding new authors. 

Share your participation on Twitter, Google+, and Facebook with this ready-to-go tweet. Or make your own! Sharing expands our reach.

Discover great NEW favorite mystery authors on Writing into the Sunset! http://bit.ly/1SnJUh5 #Thriller #Mystery #MustReads

Thursday, September 22, 2016

5 Pioneering Nurses by Paty Jager



While researching for information on the first women doctors, I came across information on some remarkable women who were nurses. Since my mom was a nurse and something I don’t have the stomach or the compassion to do, I am always interested in women who do work in this profession.

wikipedia
Mary Ann Bickerdyke – She was a nurse for the Yankee’s in the Civil War.  She was from Ohio and known as “Mother Bickerdyke” the “Cyclone in Calico”. She was never trained as a nurse. Her personal experience and common sense helped her set up hospitals on the battlefields, on ships, in barns, homes and abandoned buildings.  I’m thinking her Cyclone in Calico came while she set up some three hundred field hospitals for General Ulysses S. Grant’s western armies.  Her duties included nursing, cooking, organizing supplies, and transporting the wounded. She also gathered herbs for poultices and medicines she made.

Susie King Taylor -  An African American woman who accompanied her husband to battle and became a nurse during the Civil War. During this war African American women were accepted as nurses and weren’t treated with prejudice.

Louisa May Alcott -  This novelist was more than a writer. She was a Union nurse. Louisa worked to make the wounded comfortable and keep up their morale. 

Kate Cumming – A Southern nurse who came from well to-do family. Most women in the south who came from families of influence were discouraged from working as a nurse. It was felt to be a degrading occupation. Yet there were many Southern women who became nurses. 

Octavia Bridgewater – Before the flu epidemic following the end of World War I, African American women were banned from the Army Nurse Corps and the Red Cross. After the epidemic there was a need for more nurses. Octavia who was from Helena, Montana was a pioneer black nurse.  When she was refused admissions into a nursing program in her home state, she applied to Lincoln School of Nursing in New York. It was one of the few schools accepting African Americans. She graduated in 1930 and went back to Helena and worked in the hospital there. In the 1940’s she became one of a few black women accepted into the U.S. Army Nurse Corps.

Paty Jager writes murder mysteries and steamy romance starring cowboys and Indians.
blog / websiteFacebook / Paty's Posse / Goodreads / Twitter / Pinterest


Source: Bleed, Blister, and Purge: A History of Medicine on the American Frontier by Volney Steele, M.D.

Monday, September 19, 2016

Catch a Clue- Find an Author


Every Monday catch a clue about a new to you mystery, thriller, or suspense book or author. 

Authors: In comments give readers a five sentence passage from one of your books. 

Include:
Title
Author
genre (mystery, thriller, suspense)
buy link
Website or Amazon Author page link. 

Go here for easy to follow instruction on how to hyper link your the buy link and your website or Author Page.  https://exquisitequills.blogspot.com/p/how-to-use-active-links-in-comments.html


Readers enjoy finding new authors. 

Share your participation on Twitter, Google+, and Facebook with this ready-to-go tweet. Or make your own! Sharing expands our reach.

Discover great NEW favorite mystery authors on Writing into the Sunset! http://bit.ly/1SnJUh5 #Suspense #Mystery #MustReads